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Artists, Lawyers, Human Rights Groups to Netflix – Cancel AMO

We, artists and human rights advocates, express our deep concern over the screening of AMO, a series about the brutal war on Drugs campaign waged in the Philippines. According to its director Brillante Mendoza, the show will dramatize the drug problem in the country from the point of view of the victims as well as the “victimizer”.

Open Letter to Netflix CEO Mr. Reed Hastings:

The Asian Network of People who Use Drugs (ANPUD) and the International Network of People who Use Drugs (INPUD) have released an open letter to Mr. Reed Hastings, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Netflix. In the letter, the two human rights organizations demand that Netflix immediately cancel plans to stream the Philippines drug war series “AMO” that actively promotes murder, extrajudicial killings, violence, and the war on drugs in the Philippines.

ICC investigation in the Philippines: Asian drug users hope for justice

The Asian Network of People who Use Drugs (ANPUD) welcomes the decision of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to open a preliminary examination into the war on drugs in the Philippines.

Global Coalition Calls for International Criminal Court Intervention in the Philippines

As Philippine Government sponsored mass killings top 13,000, a global coalition of NGOs and advocates say International Criminal Court (ICC) intervention is urgent following the Philippine governments denials and threats to withdraw from the ICC.

Apple Removes Games promoting Duterte’s War on Drugs

ANPUD led a global petition demanding Apple Incorporation’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Mr. Tim Cook to urgently perform a formal review and remove all the apps made available by Apple immediately and issue an apology for hosting insensitive content. The petition was a successful advocacy effort in that the letter was able to generate huge media attention and some of the games were removed from the App Store. The case study is intended to document the story of victory and disseminate the detailed set of actions performed in the process.

Why so much discrimination against People who Use Drugs?

One of the unintended consequences of international drug control is the way we perceive and deal with the users of drugs that have been made illegal. A system appears to have been created in which those who fall into the web of dependence find themselves excluded and marginalized from the social mainstream, tainted with a moral stigma, and often unable to find treatment, even when they may be motivated to want it.

An Open Letter to Apple CEO Mr. Tim Cook: Immediately remove apps that are promoting war on drugs in the Philippines.

In the letter, 131 organizations including human rights and drug policy reform groups have demanded Apple to immediately remove apps (games) that are promoting murder, extrajudicial killings, violence, and the war on drugs in the Philippines.

We don’t deserve bullet

Anand spoke along with five other panelists at a session titled “Dying Democracy: A Public Forum on the War on Drugs and Human Rights in the Philippines” that was organized by the Advocacy Network Against Killings in the Philippines (ANAK) on October 5, 2017 at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Thailand in Bangkok.

Stand with ANPUD – Call for Sign-On

Numerous apps currently available through Apple are actively promoting the war on people who use drugs in the Philippines, a war that has resulted in the state-endorsed murders of more than 13,000 people – many of them children – ostensibly suspected of using or selling drugs since June 2016.

Atrocity in the Philippines: How Rodrigo Duterte’s War on Drug Users May Exacerbate the Burgeoning HIV Epidemic

In this issue of JAIDS, Verdery and colleagues report a social network study of persons who inject drugs (PWID) in 2 cities in the Philippines.