Symposium Panorama – HCV and PWID in Asia: Strategies for Treatment Scale-up

HCV prevalence in Asia and the Pacific varies between countries. HCV infection is due to unsterile medical injections (2 , 3) contaminated blood transfusions, (4) traditional cultural practices60 and, more recently, injecting drug use. (5) While iatrogenic transmission still occurs in some countries, transmission as the result of injecting drug use is increasing. (6)

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Global report on access to hepatitis C treatment – Focus on overcoming barriers

This is the first-ever global report on treatment access to hepatitis C medicines. The report provides the information that countries and health authorities need to identify the appropriate HCV treatment, and procure it at affordable prices. The report uses the experience of several pioneering countries to demonstrate how barriers to treatment access can be overcome.

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Barriers to hepatitis C diagnosis, management and treatment in four Asian Countries: India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Nepal.

WHO, UNAIDS and UNODC guidelines setting targets for national governments for universal access to HIV prevention, care and support include treatment for HCV and hepatitis B virus as part of the comprehensive package of services for PWID,14 but countries are unable to implement these treatments at scale because of their expense.
It is against this background that ANPUD embarked on this project, to begin to investigate and document the barriers to diagnosis, management and treatment of HCV amongst PWID. Four countries were chosen for the pilot study: India, Indonesia, Nepal and Malaysia, as being representative of these wide and varied regions.
This investigation and documentation provides some of the necessary foundations for the next steps, in which ANPUD will develop a regional hepatitis C advocacy strategy based on the study findings. These findings will help ensure that this strategy addresses the key issues in a prioritised manner, responding to and being driven by the needs of the community.

DRUG USE IN ASIA: IDPC DRUG POLICY GUIDE 2016 Principles and practices for decriminalisation

DRUG USE IN ASIA: IDPC DRUG POLICY GUIDE 2016 Principles and practices for decriminalisation

In this report, the International Drug Policy Consortium (IDPC) offers recommendations based on evidence and examples of good practice to inform a shift in policy responses to drug use in Asia away from criminalization and punishment, and towards public health and harm reduction. It describes effective approaches to the decriminalization of drug use. It also discusses approaches implemented in Asia that have proven ineffective, such as the detention of people who use drugs in compulsory centres as a form of ‘rehabilitation’.

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UNGASS 2016 PREPARATIONS

In April 2016, world leaders will gather in New York to decide on the future of global drug policy, at the first UN General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS). As a preparation to this open debate, the Civil Society Organizations representing people who use drugs from different countries in the South Asia (Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Maldives, Sri Lanka and India) and South East and East Asia (China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam) region came together for regional civil society consultations during October 2015. These two extensive consultations held in New Delhi, India and Malaysia had imperative discussion to lay forward recommendations for the UNGASS 2016.

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